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Marmaris
 
 
MARMARİS

Marmaris (Turkish pronunciation: [ˈmaɾmaɾis]) is a port city and tourist resort on the Mediterranean coast, located in Muğla Province, southwest Turkey, along the shoreline of the Turkish Riviera.
 
Marmaris' main source of income is tourism. It is located between two intersecting sets of mountains by the sea, though following a construction boom in the 1980s, little is left of the sleepy fishing village that Marmaris was until the late 20th century. In 2010, the city's population was 30,957,[3]and peaks at around 300,000 to 400,000 people during the tourist season.
 
It is also a centre for sailing and diving, possessing two major and several smaller marinas. It is a popular wintering location for hundreds of cruising boaters, being also served by the nearby Dalaman Airport.
 
Climate

Marmaris has a hot-summer Mediterranean climate(Köppen: Csa) characterised by a hot dry summers and mild rainy winters. Showers and rain are very unlikely between May and October.
 
Summers are hot and dry, and temperatures are especially high during the heatwaves in July and August. October is still warm and bright, though with spells of rain, and many tourists prefer to visit in the early autumn, especially in September, because the temperatures are not as hot.
 
Winters are mild and wet. Winter is the rainy season, with major precipitation falling after November. The annual rainfall can reach to 1,232.7 millimetres (48.531 in); the rainfall is concentrated during scattered days in winter falling in heavy cloudbursts which cause flash floodssometimes in flood prone areas.[4]
 
 
History

Historical map of Marmaris by Piri Reis
Historical map of Marmaris by Piri Reis
Although it is not certain when Marmaris was founded, in the 6th century BC the site was known as Physkos (Ancient Greek: Φύσκος or Φοῦσκα), also Latinized as Physcus, and was in a part of Caria that belonged to Rhodes, contained a magnificent harbour and a grove sacred to Leto.[6][7]
 
According to the historian Herodotus, there had been a castle on the site since 3000 BC. In 334 BC, Caria was invaded by Alexander the Great and the castle of Physkos was besieged. The 600 inhabitants of the town realised that they had no chance against the invading army and burned their valuables in the castle before escaping to the hills with their women and children. The invaders, well aware of the strategic value of the castle, repaired the destroyed sections to house a few hundred soldiers before the main army returned home.
 
 
Marmaris Castle

The city became known as Marmaris during the period of the Beylikof Menteşe; the name derives from the Turkish word mermer, Greek màrmaron (marble) in reference to the rich deposits of marble in the region, and the prominent role of the city's port in the marble trade.
 
In the mid-fifteenth century, Sultan Mehmed the Conquerorconquered and united the various tribes and kingdoms of Anatoliaand the Balkans, and acquired Constantinople. The Knights of St. John, based in Rhodes had fought the Ottoman Turks for many years; they also withstood the onslaughts of Mehmed II. When sultan Suleiman the Magnificent set out for the conquest of Rhodes, Marmaris served as a base for the Ottoman Navy and Marmaris Castle was rebuilt from scratch in 1522.
 
Lord Nelson and his entire fleet sheltered in the harbour of Marmaris in 1798, en route to Egypt to defeat Napoleon's armada during the Mediterranean campaign.
 
The 1957 Fethiye earthquakes almost completely destroyed the city. Only the Marmaris Castle and the historic buildings surrounding the fortress were left undamaged.
 
Since 1979, renovation work has been continuing at the castle. Under the auspices of the Ministry of Culture, the castle was converted into a museum. There are seven galleries. The largest is used as an exhibition hall, the courtyard is decorated with seasonal flowers. Built at the same time as the castle in the bazaar, there is also a small Ottoman caravanserai built by Suleiman's mother Ayşe Hafsa Sultan.
 
Archaeology

In 2018, archaeologists discovered the tomb of the ancient Greek boxer Diagoras near the city of Marmaris. They announced that a pyramid-shaped structure was the mausoleum of the Greek boxer. The following words inscribed in the mausoleum: “I will be vigilant at the very top so as to ensure that no coward can come and destroy this grave,”[8] Until 1970, the structure was believed to be the grave of a saint and was visited by locals seeking answers to their prayers, but upon discovery that it was not a holy site, the structure was looted.
 
Natural history

Interior of Nimara Cave on Heaven Island
Interior of Nimara Cave on Heaven Island
Nimara Cave is a cave on Heaven Island near Marmaris.[10] Since ancient times, the cave was used as a place of worship. According to the ancient Greek historian Herodotus, human presence in the cave (as well as the old city of Physkos, today called Marmaris), dates back to 3000 BC. However, excavations carried out by the Municipality of Marmaris in 2007 extended this period to almost 12,000 years back.[11] The research conducted in the cave has revealed the existence of a cult of Mother Goddess Leto, believed to be the mother of God Apollo and Goddess Artemis, in the ancient city of Physkos. The cave is located at the highest point of Heaven Island and was used as a place of worship by the ancient residents of the town of Nimara. The worshipping took place around the main rock that exists even today. This main rock is surrounded by stone altars in a semi-circle raised at about 30 cm from the ground. Offerings to the Mother Goddess Leto were placed on these elevated stones. The offerings were made in the form of cremations, glass beads, terracotta, and sculptures of Leto. The cave was also in use during the Romanperiod. Nimara Cave has been declared a protected area in 1999. It shelters trogloxene butterflies, identical to those living in Fethiye's Butterfly Valley (Turkish: Kelebekler Vadisi).
 
The Marmaris peninsula is the westernmost habitat for Tulipa armena, which normally grows in Eastern Turkey, Iran, and Transcaucasia at much higher altitudes.[12] The plants may have been introduced during the Ottoman period.
 
Sports

The Final Four matches of the 2013 Men's European Volleyball League were held at the Amiral Orhan Aydın Sports Hall in Marmaris from July 13 to 14, 2013.
 
The Presidential Cycling Tour of Turkey (Turkish: Cumhurbaşkanlığı Bisiklet Turu) is a professional road bicycle racing stage race held each spring.
 
Being an almost perfect setting for sailing, every year in late October Marmaris hosts an annual regatta attracting international as well as Turkish boats and crews.
 
Marmaris has much to offer for outdoor sports lovers. Visitors may do variety of great outsports in Marmaris such as going on 4WD drives, jeep safari, quad & buggy safari, bike rides, forest rides on mountain bikes, sailing catamaran trips, jet-ski rides, canoeing, rafting, climbing, diving, paintball, horseback riding, mountain hikes, hang gliding, karting and more.[14][15]
 
From 2018, Marmaris is scheduled to host a round of the FIA World Rally Championship.
 
 
Panoramic view of the coastline of Marmaris, Muğla Province, southwest Turkey, Mediterranean.
Marmaris harbour
Marmaris harbour
Marmaris harbour
Marmaris harbour
View of Netsel Marina
View of Netsel Marina
Dolphinarium in Marmaris
Dolphinarium in Marmaris
View of Netsel Marina and Marmaris town
View of Netsel Marina and Marmaris town
Marmaris Waterfront
Marmaris Waterfront
Marmaris Waterfront and Castle
Marmaris Waterfront and Castle
Marmaris center
Marmaris center
Marmaris, Old Town
Marmaris, Old Town
Marmaris, a street in the Old Town
Marmaris, a street in the Old Town
Hotel Mares, Marmaris
Hotel Mares, Marmaris
Mermaid statue at the port of Marmaris
Mermaid statue at the port of Marmaris
Streets of Marmaris
Streets of Marmaris
National holiday decorations in Marmaris
National holiday decorations in Marmaris
Streets of Marmaris
Streets of Marmaris PreviousNext
 
 
A tourist village but picturesque
 
 
The port of Marmaris was originally a small quiet town bordering the clear, warm waters of the Mediterranean. It is from the 80s that tourism has developed strongly to the point of making it today one of the main tourist destinations of the country, with several hundred of thousands of visitors each summer. The place is even the favorite summer spot for young Englishmen. It is now part of the trilogy of Turkish ports become very touristy, near Kusadasi and Bodrum. The city does not have an architectural interest as important as some other destinations in the country but the sweetness of life that reigns there and the picturesque charm of its old city are enough to make it a place where one has pleasure to stay and relax. Unlike the other tourist sites that surround it, which have become concentrations of hotels and have oriented all their development around a tourism barely controlled, the city of Marmaris has kept An authentic stamp of its own. And for those looking for cultural tourism, do not panic, the city does not lack anything since it is surrounded by many spectacular sites to visit with daily departures from Marmaris itself.
 
 
If it does not have a great architectural heritage, the city of Marmaris is not devoid of cultural interest so far, and visitors can stroll along the narrow streets of the city. old town by discovering some historical sites. The 16th century fort overlooking the port, a fairly imposing building, and the caravansail anchor Marmaris in the past. The historical visitor will also be able to visit the fortress built by Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent as he sits on the island of Rhodes. In the fortress is a museum that explains in detail the events of the era. The fortress itself would be built on the ruins of an even older fortress, dating from Alexander the Great. After these historic visits the visitor can take the pulse of the city by going to the bazaar, the place of all the exchanges and where the French is easily understood. Always in Marmaris, it is possible to make a tour of the bay by fishing boat. The experience is not lacking in charm as the bay is home to natural wonders such as phosphorescent caves and other aquariums when the bottom of the water becomes crystal clear over several meters. Natural beauties that make Marmaris a charming city.
 
 
 
Area of ​​Marmaris: Hisarönü
 
 
For those who stay longer and wish to continue their discovery of the region, the surroundings of Marmaris are full of points of interest that they are archeological, historical, cultural or sporting. All you have to do is check with a hotel or tourist agency for information on shuttles, tours and guides available to visitors. Most of the time, the visitor will be able to visit all the neighboring villages by stopping a Dolmus on the main road coming out of the city, telling his driver the place of destination. First obligatory stop: Hisaronu. At only twenty kilometers from Marmaris, in a recently classified sector protected by the government site is the small village of Hisaronu. The place is as charming as it is interesting. Indeed, there are many vestiges of the glorious past of the region. In addition, enjoying regular and moderate winds, Hisaronu is a very popular site for sailing sports. The visit of the surroundings can be done on foot, by mountain bike, or even by boat, which increases the pleasure to be found in such a landscape. There are many small pensions outside the village for those who wish to enjoy their charms longer.
 
 
 
The unexpected village: Datça 
 
 
If we push a little further we find the village of Datça. The 2 hours that separates Marmaris from this city are enchanting as the winding road crosses sublime landscapes. You can get there by bus with departures from Marmaris very regularly the day, or by ferry from the port of Marmaris. The place is charming and has the immense merit of being a Turkish tourist destination! This is an opportunity to mix with the country's culture in a relaxed setting and at the heart of a surprising nature. The ideal spot in the area is to go swimming in the nearby coves. But beware of the growing tourism of this small town that could quickly make him lose this charm so pleasantâ 
 
 
 
For its beach: Palamut Burku
 
 
Palamut Burku is the pearl of the coast in the region. Located between Cnidus and Datca, the small town of Palamut Burku has as its main interest its superb beach and the set of coves that surround it, accessible by paths along the coast. Here too, many Turkish tourists. It is an opportunity to immerse oneself in the local culture while enjoying a place still largely sheltered from the excesses of tourist overexploitation. For lovers of local produce, all you have to do is sit down at the terrace of one of the small boarding houses on the beach where you can enjoy fresh fish. It is possible to reach Marmaris in Dolmus or Bodrum by boat from Palamut Buku.
 
 
 
Cnide, the boat trip from Marmaris 
 
 
Cnide, or Knidos, is accessible by boat from Marmaris, on the occasion of a very pleasant stroll along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. You can also get there by taxi but the race is expensive. Cnide is located on the end of the peninsula, on a cut-and-rugged corner of the coast. That's what makes the scenery so beautiful, a tangle of coves at the foot of a winding, unpaved road. One finds even the ruins of an ancient city that had been home there. The city would have been coveted by Sparta and Athens at its hour of glory and experienced the Roman and Byzantine empires. A rich history, therefore, that the city tells us about a sea of ​​prodigious beauty.
 
 
 
Bozburun, the landscape village
 
 
For those who have rented a vehicle and wish to stop in a splendid landscape, the city of Bozburun is really all right. Thanks to its numerous restaurants, the visitor who stops there will be spoiled for choice to savor local specialties, especially fresh fish caught nearby. To get there without a vehicle, take a Dolmus from Marmaris and join Bozburun in about 1h30. The only disappointment at this stop, there are no beaches as sublime as those that can be found in other villages along the coast, in the image of knidus.
 
 
 
The trilogy of the surroundings: Kaunos, Koycegiz and Mesudiye
 
 
For visitors ready to take their daily stroll further, there are other points of interest near Marmaris. This is the case first of Kaunos. The access is a little complicated since you have to go first to Ortaca, thanks to the buses that leave every hour from Marmaris, then to take a Dolmus to the port where a small boat ¨ne visitors in 15 minutes to the spectacular site of Dalyan. Here, there is no hotel or tourist infrastructure, but a protected and truly splendid nature. Easier access, adventurers can take a Dolmus in Marmaris that goes to Koycegiz. This village, surrounded by citrus groves, is a fresh and pleasant getaway. It is also possible to reach Dalyan by boat from its port. Initially a pretty picturesque village, Koycegiz has become another victim of tourism on this coast and several traders have already converted to target foreign visitors. No matter, the place is charming and remains typical. Another visit from Marmaris, Mesudiye. Several Dolmus serve this destination every day so it is easy to get there. The city is only 20 kilometers from Marmaris, but half is on the track. The place is very quiet, devoid of visitors and lives at the slow pace of a huge beach almost deserted.
 
 
 
Excursions departing from Marmaris
 
 
For the more adventurous, or the sportsmen, excursions exist at the beginning of Marmaris. You can opt for scuba diving and discover the underwater life of this little corner of paradise. To register you just have to go to the port in one of the agencies that offer its services with frequent departures by boat. Beach lovers and idleness? The walk not to be missed is offered by local fishermen. By boarding with them on their boat, it is possible to make a tour of the surrounding beaches for a whole day. The walk is worthwhile because it gives access to the most beautiful beaches in the area, formerly only accessible by water. You can swim in crystal clear water. For culture festivals, it is possible to visit the Kaunos site. The visit lasts a day, with 4 hours of trip by boat that can be provocative. It is however possible to choose to go there by bus. Another walk for lovers of historical sites, the visit of Rhodes that defies Marmaris on the other side of the bay. You can get there by ferry, the trip lasts 4 hours, or by hydrofoil in just 45 minutes.
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